The unnatural truth about fertilizing container plants

Next time you consider using "natural" fertilizers for your container plants, remind yourself that there's nothing "natural" about growing plants in a container.

Nothing wrong with container-grown plants or natural fertilizers. I grow plants in containers myself, and usually prefer organic fertilizers. But containers create an artificial environment that just isn't suitable for most organic fertilizers.

For one, the potting soil you buy in the store has been more or less sterilized. You might think that's a good thing, and for most containers, it's to some degree beneficial. But gardening is not open-heart surgery. And there are a lot of downsides to having sterile soil. Good garden soil is normally teeming with microbes and soil elements that help to break down and store organic fertilizers. Sterilized, store-bought soil mixes have none of that.

Scotts Osmocote Fertilizers - Fertilizers

Syngenta Flowers has opened its ability to Gilroy, California, and revenue of its three divisions Thursday.

Culture media Fafard author has launched a complete range of mixtures of details that make it easier for producers to feed their crops. Through an exclusive agreement with the Scotts Company, Fafard has begun to integrate first controlled distribute fertilizer Osmocote in its standard mixtures. Fully coated fertilizers containing both macronutrients (nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium) and micronutrients. The fertilizer granules Pygmy provide flow distribution, even for a maximum period of six weeks.The mixtures are intended for pots 4 inches and smaller.

Don't fall behind on bloomin' summer | THE COMPLEAT HOME GARDENER

  1. Fertilize lightly two or three times during the summer with an all-purpose fertilizer or with a slow-release fertilizer such as Osmocote. Third Saturday group to hear about native plants. Donna Thibodeaux, Master Gardener since 2010, will speak on the
  2. Geraniums do well with a slow-release plant food such as Osmocote and many gardeners claim that their geraniums produce the most blooms when the plants are slightly stressed – either root bound in a pot that looks too small or allowed to dry out
  3. Geraniums do well with a slow release plant food, such as Osmocote, and many gardeners claim that their geraniums produce the most blooms when the plants are slightly stressed — either root bound in a pot that looks too small or allowed to dry out 
  4. When you deadhead geraniums, be sure to remove the stems as well as the blossoms. Collect any yellow leaves from the base of the plants. Geraniums do well with a slow-release plant food such as Osmocote. Many gardeners claim their geraniums produce 
  5. Desert plants are a curious crew, with cacti and succulents among the most inexplicable at times. On one hand, my friend Gino Dreese swears that his golden barrel cactus are so enormous because he liberally feeds them with Miracle Grow. On the other